Burdick Newsletters

Spring, 2017


Alden Burdick

submitted by Brenda King (BrendaDKing@gmail.com)

(The Burdick family connections to The Church Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has been featured many times in this Newsletter. From Rebecca Winters to Heber Grant, Burdicks have long been associated with the Church. Brenda brings to light another link through the person of Alden Burdick who was an early follower of Joseph Smith and who was involved in several efforts of the nascent organization. -- HB)

Alden Burdick was the son of Gideon Burdick and his wife Catherine (Catharine) Robertson. Alden was the fifth of seven children and the youngest of three sons. He was an early convert to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, for by 1834 he was already a member and a volunteer to accompany the Prophet Joseph Smith on Zions Camp, the venture to succor the saints in Missouri. It seems that the conversion was a family affair for his older brother Thomas was called as a clerk and later as a bishop. His brother Elias died in Pleasant Grove, Utah and thus also may be assumed to have been a member.

Alden was married to Jerusha Parks. I have the date as about 1825. The Ancestral File gives the date of the marriage as 1845 in Nauvoo, Illinois but the oldest of Alden and Jerusha’s eleven children was born about 1824 with younger children being born along over the years. It is inconceivable that Alden and Jerusha were not married all those years. The Ancestral File may be in error or it might be referring to the sealing in the Nauvoo Temple which took place years after the civil marriage. It seems far more likely that Alden married Jerusha about 1823 when he was about twenty.

As has been mentioned, Alden was a member of Zions Camp. A year later in February of 1835 he was called to become a Seventy and a member of the First Quorum of the Seventy. Although the First Quorum is specifically designated by the Lord as a quorum having equal authority with the First Presidency and the Twelve, there is no evidence that they ever functioned as a governing quorum in the Kirtland-Missouri-Nauvoo era.

We may assume that Alden remained faithful as he is not mentioned in the histories as having participated in any apostasy and he died in Nauvoo, Illinois.

This biography previously started out with the words, "Very little is known of Alden Burdick." Now, thanks to a gracious epistle from Sister Carol Ann Burdick Poulson, a third great-granddaughter of Elder Burdick, considerably more has been learned.

From the Ancestral File we learn that Alden Burdick was born September 12, 1803 in Jamestown, Chataugua, New York, and that he was the son of Gideon Burdick and his wife Catherine Robertson. Gideon Burdick was a veteran of the Revolutionary War. There has always been a great tradition of patriotism in this family. The Burdick family has been in America since about 1650. There is also a history of Burdick ancestors searching for religious truth in earlier generations. Alden's ancestors were founding members of the Seventh-day Baptist Church (or Sabbatarians) in Newport Rhode Island and Westerly, Rhode Island, approximately between 1665 and 1671.

Gideon Burdick and his family lived in the Chautauqua, New York area. From references in the Utah Genealogical and Historical Magazine: "At the outlet of Lake Chautauqua, near Buffalo...the gospel message was brought... Gideon Burdick and family were baptized in June 1833. In November they joined the body of the Church in Kirtland, Ohio.

"Membership in the Church brought severe persecution. The saints at Kirtland were bending every effort to complete their Temple. 'The Church was in a state of poverty and distress, in consequence of which it appeared almost impossible that the commandments could be fulfilled (relative to the Kirtland Temple); at the same time our enemies were raging and threatening destruction upon us, and we had to guard ourselves night after night, and for weeks were not permitted to take off our clothes, and were obliged to lay with our fire-locks in our arms.' So writes one eye-witness of those trying days. Throughout that fall and winter Gideon Burdick and his sons labored on the temple, on short rations, by day and 'at night watching to protect the walls they had laid during the day from threatened violence.'

Alden was the fifth of seven children and the youngest of three sons. At the time of his baptism, he was already a young adult with a wife and young children. Alden and Jerusha had been married about 1825, as their first-born, Columbus Burdick, was born in 1826, presumably in New York State.

Notwithstanding wife and children, Alden volunteered, in 1834 to accompany the Prophet Joseph Smith on Zions Camp, the venture to succor the suffering Saints in Missouri. It seems that the religious fervor shown by Alden, his father, and earlier ancestors was a family affair, for his older brother Thomas was called as a clerk and later as a bishop. His brother Elias died in Pleasant Grove, Utah and thus also may be assumed to have been a member.

Alden was married to Jerusha Parks but the date is somewhat in doubt. The Ancestral File gives the date of the marriage as 1845 in Nauvoo, Illinois but Columbus, the oldest of Alden and Jerusha's eleven children was born about 1826 with younger children being born along over the years. Grampa Bill finds it inconceivable that Alden and Jerusha were not married all those years. The Ancestral File may be in error or, perhaps more likely, it might be referring to sealing in the Nauvoo Temple which took place years after their civil marriage.

As has been mentioned, Alden was a member of Zion's Camp. A year later in February of 1835 he was called to become a Seventy and a member of the First Quorum of the Seventy. He was ordained under the hands of the Prophet Joseph Smith and was the first Seventy to walk this earth since the days of the Savior! His brother-in-law, Hiram Winters was the second. The Lord had specifically designated the First Quorum as a quorum having equal authority with the First Presidency and the Twelve, thus, Elder Alden Burdick cemented his position as a General Authority. There is no evidence, however, that the First Quorum ever functioned as a governing quorum in the Kirtland-Missouri-Nauvoo era.

Elder Burdick remained faithful and is not mentioned in the histories as having participated in any apostasy or rebellion against either the Church or against the Prophet. Elder Burdick died August 20, 1845 in Nauvoo, Illinois in full company and fellowship of the Saints. Perhaps his death at an early age was hastened by the persecutions he had endured during his tenure as a member. If so, we may account him as a martyr for cause of the Gospel. We cite a family history (author unknown) "Alden Burdick proved staunch to the Church of the Latter Day Saints throughout all those days of trial and was devout in his manner of life. On his deathbed, he counseled his wife to follow the leaders of the church wherever they went. With her family of 11 children, she emmigrated to Utah about 1852. She lived for a time in Salt Lake City and supported her family by tailoring... (then) keeping a boarding place...(and later) gained a knowledge of medicine which she practiced as her profession in Carson City, Nev. and in California. Later...she returned to Farmington, Utah where she died (in 1883)." Jerusha and Alden's son Alden Jr. was a youthful companion of Joseph F. Smith, son of the Patriarch Hyrum Smith and later President of the Church. In fact, the younger Alden may be credited with helping to save President Smith's life while on the trek west.


History of Milton, Wisconsin

submitted by Laurel Pieper (laurelpieper@prodigy.net)

(Milton, Wisconsin has been mentioned many times in this Newsletter. It is rich in Burdick family history with numerous illustrious ancestors hailing from the area, Laurel's branch being one of them. She came across this history of the community that appears on Milton's official website. I enjoyed it and thought you would, too. -- HB)

http://www.ci.milton.wi.us/index.aspx?NID=114.

Origin
Soldiers who served in Wisconsin Territory during the 1832 Black Hawk War returned to their homes in the east with glowing descriptions of this area's beautiful prairies, burr oak openings, and swift sparkling streams. The Milton area was known then as Prairie du Lac (Prairie of the Lakes), but the description these men brought back called it "a veritable modern Eden."

By the end of the decade, settlement had begun here. When Prairie du Lac applied for a post office in 1839, the territorial governor rejected the name as being too similar to the already established community of Prairie du Sac. At a meeting held to decide on a name, one settler remarked that when he left his home in the east, he thought of it as "Paradise Lost," but when he saw where Milton now stands, he called it "Paradise Regained." So the town was named for the author of "Paradise Lost," the poet John Milton.

Founder
Joseph Goodrich founded Milton and built the first frame house here. But his legacy is his 1844 hexagonal stagecoach inn, the Milton House, the first poured grout building in the United States. Today, it is a National Historic Landmark, the oldest concrete building still standing in the U.S., and one of 14 recognized stations on the Underground Railroad. Goodrich was a staunch abolitionist and the inn has a tunnel beneath it that provided a hiding place for runaway slaves. Today, the Milton House is a museum, with tours conducted by the Milton Historical Society.

Milton Junction
One mile to the west of Milton, a second community called West Milton was settled. In the 1850s, two railroads were built through West Milton. This crossing of the two roads led to the community changing its name to Milton Junction. Milton and Milton Junction operated as separate communities until a merger in 1967. To this day, there are still two downtown areas in Milton: Parkview Drive on the east side of the city and Merchants Row in the old Milton Junction area to the west.

Milton College
1844 was a busy year for Goodrich. Besides building the Milton House, he also built and founded Milton Academy, which evolved into Milton College. For 138 years, it was a prestigious private institution until financial troubles caused its closing in 1982. It had been the oldest college in the State of Wisconsin. Today, several of the college buildings have found new life as antique shops, offices, apartments, and the city library. For National Football League fans, however, Milton College's name lived on through the 1990s, as 1980 graduate Dave Krieg enjoyed fame as a star quarterback for the Seattle Seahawks.

Slogan
The City of Milton adopted the slogan “History in Progress” in 1999. The two themes represented in this slogan mirror the strengths of our city.

Landmarks
The City of Milton takes great pride in its past: our documented link to the Underground Railroad, the lore and legacy of Milton College (1844-1982), a tradition of railroad traffic in the city, the beautiful churches which dot our landscape, and the widely known and appreciated tourist opportunities in our area. Our most distinctive historical gem, the Milton House National Historic Landmark, is proudly featured on our city logo.

History in Progress
Milton recognizes that today’s progress is what makes tomorrow’s history. The city uses its history to build its future as a significant community in south central Wisconsin. Annual community social events bring thousands of visitors to Milton every year. Businesses find our city to be a great place of opportunity, and we are a growing industrial hub. The railroad has strengthened Milton’s economy since 1852 and continues to do so today.

Milton values and embraces its history as it progresses into the future.


Almond Elmer Burdick, M.D.

submitted by Karen Baker (ferency.baker@gmail.com)

(The Burdick family has had many prominent members. Karen has brought one of them to light - Dr. Almond Elmer Burdick (I111998). The following biography of him comes from the 1903 book "Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont." -- HB)

Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont

Compiled under the Editorial Supervision of
Hon. Hiram Carleton of Montpelier
1903

Page 636

Almond Elmer Burdick, M.D.

Dr. Burdick, familiarly known as Dr. E. A. Burdick, general practitioner of Winooski, Vermont, is a grandson of Cornelius Van Ness Burdick, who was a prominent resident of Fletcher, Vermont, and for a number of years successfully followed the occupation of a stonemason; later he removed to Westford, Vermont, where he resided for the remainder of his life, and acquired a comfortable competence in the pursuit of the same line oi trade, He was united in marriage to Miss White, and thirteen children were born to them, eleven of whom are living at the present time (1902). Mr. Burdick's death occurred at the age of sixty-three years.

Wellington Burdick, father of Dr. E. A. Burdick, was born in Fletcher, Vermont, and after acquiring a practical education in the common schools of his native town, was engaged for a number of years in agricultural pursuits ; he then removed to Canada, where he was interested in the lumber trade for a short period of time; he then returned to the state of Vermont, settled in Hyde Park, and again followed the occupation of farming. After remaining in that town for some years he took up his residence in Nashua, New Hampshire, where he still resides, and assumed the responsible position of manager of an extensive feed store.

Mr. Burdick married Miss Lodica Wood, who was born in Fairfax, Vermont; her mother, Polly Wood, was a native of Waterville, Vermont. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Burdick, two of whom are now living: Dr. Almond E. Burdick, and Irving A. Burdick, a resident of Nashua, New Hampshire. The mother of these children died at the age of thirty-eight years. Both Mr. and Mrs. Burdick were members of the Methodist Episcopal church.

Dr. Almond E. Burdick was born in Cambridge, Vermont, October 27, 1868, and his early education was acquired in the common schools of the various cities in which his parents resided. Subsequently he settled in Winooski, Vermont, and began the study of medicine under the efficient preceptorship of his uncle, Dr. John L. F. Burdick, one of the eminent physicians of Winooski, who was born in Ira, Rutland county, Vermont, December 16, 1824, and died December 11, 1897. (A full sketch of his career is found elsewhere in this work.)

After pursuing the regular course of preparation with his uncle, Dr. Burdick attended the lectures at the University of Vermont and assisted his uncle with the duties of his large and lucrative practice up to the time of the decease of the latter. He then assumed charge of the practice, which extended over the area of Burlington, Winooski and the surrounding county, also acting in the capacity of health officer of the town and attending physician at the Fanny Allen Hospital.

In addition to his large practice Dr. Burdick has dealt extensively in horses, being the owner of a number of blooded animals, some of which have made fine records. Dr. Burdick is a prominent member of the Knights of Pythias, and has also served as venerable consul for a number of years of the Woodman of America. He is a member of the Winooski fire department, having served as chief engineer for a number of years. Dr. Burdick is one of the most affable of men, has made many friends, and is highly esteemed for his admirable characteristics, as well as for his marked ability as a physician.


The Marriage of K.D. Burdick

submitted by Wanda Henderson (donda50@verizon.net)

(Chalk this one up to the list of weird family stories. Wanda's ggg-grandmother married K.D. Burdick in Wisconsin in 1889. She has uncovered these odd news stories from the local newspapers of the day. If anyone can help solve this mystery please contact us. -- HB)

Alton Evening Telegraph, Alton, IL
1889 Mar 20, pg 1

Determined to Marry Some One.

ROCKFORD, Ill, March 20 - K D Burdick, aged 84, came from Connellsville, Pa, to Rockford last week and went to the house of Mrs Mary Delee, whom he expected to marry. He was broken-hearted to find a funeral in progress, the prospective bride lying dead. He burst into a paroxysm of grief and said: “I have come all the way from Pennsylvania on purpose to marry her; what shall I do?” The next day he went out and proposed marriage to several widows. He was finally accepted by Mrs H R Turney, aged 81, and Saturday they went to Beloit and were married by a justice.

The Times, Philadelphia, PA
1889 Mar 26, pg 2

FEMININE FANCIES
K D Burdick, 82, and Heppebeth Turney, 81, were married at Beloit, Wis, last week.

The Weekly Courier, Connellsville, PA
1889 Mar 29, pg 1

Designs of a Mythical Connellsville Man.

A dispatch in the Chicago papers from Rockford, Illinois states that R D Burdick, aged 84, came from Connellsville to Rockford last week and went to the house of Mrs Mary Delee, whom he expected to marry. He was broken hearted to find a funeral in progress, the prospective bride lying dead. The old man burst into a paroxysm of grief and was at a loss what to do. The next day he called upon several widows and proposed marriage to of them [sic]. He was finally accepted by Mrs H R Turney, aged 81 years, and on Saturday they went to Beloit and were married by a justice. The old lady said she wanted to marry him in order to secure a gardener. When she went to introduce her husband to some friends she had to ask him what his name was. Diligent inquiry has failed to establish the identity of Burdick. No such person is ever known to have lived in Connellsville. It is thought the story is either improbable or that the man hails from somewhere else.

The Intelligencer, Anderson, SC
1889 Apr 11, pg 4

- Good gracious! K D Burdick, aged 82, and Miss Heppebeth Turney, aged 71 [sic], were married last week at Beloit, Wis. Did their guardians consent?

The Beloit Daily Free Press, Beloit, WI

Mrs Hepas P. Burdick, died at her home in Rockton, Sunday night, at the age of 88 years. She was an early settler of Rockton, having lived at that place 55 years. She was the mother of 15 children, seven of whom are still living. The funeral was held Monday.


Burdick News... Up-To-The-Minute!

Deborah Burdick (Djc6666@aol.com) is trying to find her family members. Her father was Clarence Charles burdick, born in Corbett, NY, and her mother was Emma Rosengrant. Her grandparents were Charles burdick and Lizzie Palmer. Deborah does not know much about her family since her parents died in 1963 when she was 8 years old. If you are a family member, or know this family, please contact her.

Lavonne Hoffman (lavonne_brinkmann@yahoo.com) is searching for her Burdick connection. Her mother, Louise May Burdick (b. 1927) is the daughter of Benjamin and Ruth Burdick. The Burdick genealogy lists a Benjamin Burdick (I3619) who's second wife was Ruth (Kiser) Druzen. This may be Lavonne's grandparents, but Louise is not listed as one of their children. If you can help confirm this connection it would be appreciated.

Allan Burdick (allanburdick@gmail.com) lives in Sacramento, CA but his father, Allan was born in Washington, DC. His grandfather was Allan Corey Burdick and was born and raised on the east cost. Unfortunately, Allan's father died in 1969 and he never questioned him about his ancestors. Allan Sr. lived most of his life in San Jose or Santa Clara. CA. Allan would appreciate any information about his relatives.

John Sherman (kahnny@msn.com) descends from Clark Gardner (Gardiner) who was born circa 1797/1800 in Vermont. He had two daughters, Olive and Almira. He lived in Elgin and Oxford counties in Ontario, his family having located there sometime when he was young. Olive Gardner (listed in 1851 as Garden) was living with Edward F. Brown and his wife Rebeccan Jane Hopkins in Dereham Township in 1851. Edward F. Brown is the son of Brinton Paine Brown and Elizabeth Hoy; Elizabeth's parents were Joshua Hoy and Phoebe Burdick. John is researching Burdicks that married into the Gardner family in Vermont or a surrounding area. If you know of any, please contact him.

Susie Naylor (slpn2@aol.co) is a descendant of Joseph O. Burdick (I110635) born July 15, 1827 to Amos Burdick (I635) and Debby Phillips. Joseph married Almira Jane Crandall and they had 5 children: William Orren (b. December 1, 1865), Joseph E. (b. September, 1866), Minnie Ester (b. February 11, 1871, d. January 12, 1910), Benjamin Crandall (b. 1874), and Judith Anne (b. January 31, 1877, d. April 17, 1956). Susie is trying to find out more about Joseph - a death date, death certificate, burial location, or anything else. Some records have 'Joseph O.' and others have 'Joseph C.', but Susie believes the 'O' is the correct initial.

Ed McPike (ewmcpike@gmail.com) has heard family stories that Lodema Lee, wife of his ggg-grandfather, Adam Burdick (I153), is related to Robert E. Lee of Civil War fame. Have you heard this and can help Ed determine if it is true or not?

Ruth Mesarch (MeMe82543@gmail.com) wants to know if anyone has information about Hannah Burdick (I610484). Specifically, Ruth is looking for information about her husband, David Quigg Burns. Hannah is the daughter of Nathaniel and Elizabeth "Betsey" (Post) Burdick. Hannah was born Feb. 18, 1816 in New Hampshire and died Feb. 22, 1891 in Martindale, NY. No information is know about David. If you can help please contact Ruth.

Katherine Lehtonen (KRLehtonen88@gmail.com) is a great example of persistence and her work may help other family members. she is continuing her journey to document and prove Revolutionary War ancestors as a member of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution (NSDAR). Recently two supplemental applications were approved by the NSDAR including Ichabod Burdick (I110) and Jonathan Burdick (I34). Ichabod's father, Robert (I32) is often credited with signing the Test Act of 1776. But upon further investigation that is most likely offering credit to the wrong Robert Burdick. As this ancestor lived his entire life in Westerly R.I. It would be more appropriate that that signature should be credited to his son, who did live in Hopkinton, R.I. To credit Robert Sr with patriotic service Katherine is now searching for new Patriotic or Civil service. If you have additional information please contact her.

Roberta Dobson's (dobson.roberta@gmail.com) 4g-grandfather is Edward H. Harvey, circa 1758-1835. Roberta is trying to confirm that he and Silas Harvey are brothers. His application for a pension indicates he had 10 children, one being an "entire cripple", but their name are not given. There are many Harvey's in Washington County and South Kingstown, RI so she suspects they are related but proving it has been difficult. Roberta found a land record in Charlestown so she knows Edward lived there. She also found the marriage record of Hannah Harvey and Rawsil [Roswell] Burdick (I738) which states that Hannah is Silas' daughter. Hannah was not named in her father's will, dated 14 Aug 1834, leading her to suspect that Hannah had already died by then. It makes sense that Hannah died young as Nellie Johnson states that Roswell had several children by his second wife. If you know more please let Roberta know.

Margaret Burdick (burdickartgallery@verizon.net) sends word that her father, Charles Edward Burdick died peacefully on December 14, 2016, at his home in South Wellfleet, MA. He passed one week after his 92nd birthday and one week before his grandson, Ben Burdick, was married. Born on Dec. 7, 1924, in Providence, RI, to George Edward Burdick and Marjorie (Reeves) Burdick, he was awarded the Purple Heart for his service as an army paratrooper in the Pacific during WWII. Charlie is survived by his devoted wife of 64 years, Joanne Maaloe Burdick; adoring children Margaret Burdick, Catherine Burdick Barnholtz, David Burdick and wife Funi; and loving grandchildren Anna Barnholtz, Ben Burdick and bride Maria Zervos. He was predeceased by his brother, James (Jimmy) Burdick, and leaves behind his beloved sister, Margie Burdick Keefe Barsamian, and generations of nieces and nephews in Rhode Island.

Don't forget to search the obituary web site that Carol Reppard (reppardc@gmail.com) has told us about: http://www.legacy.com/ns/obitfinder/obituary-search.aspx.


Copyright Howard E. Burdick 2018. All Rights Reserved.

howard@burdickfamily.org